Blogs

Manufacturing Matters

On Manufacturing and Innovation

Manufacturing was once widely recognized as the outstanding strength of America and the basis of its prosperity, but manufacturing also has a more recent history of being almost a pariah.  This newer view equated computer chips with potato chips, asserted that manufacturing is better left to others, and suggested that the nation is actually fortunate to be losing manufacturing and aiming to replace it with design, research, and services.

Time to Kill The Immigration Bill

As expected, the Senate betrayed workers everywhere and passed the corporate cheap labor laden immigration bill and now lobbyists are pushing it to pass the House before voters can react in 2014.  America's workers only hope now lies with Republicans, not exactly known for their labor friendly agenda.  The situation is bleak.  Even the AFL-CIO has sold out U.S. technical workers as well as low wage workers and endorsed the Senate bill.

TPP: Obama's Free (but not Fair) Secret Trade Agreement

This week several groups announced a campaign to stop the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). People have had enough experience with treaties like NAFTA to know that it is bad for the economy, bad for workers and bad for the environment. And the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement is NAFTA on steroids.

Human Nature Needs to Be Back in Business

When two bombs exploded this spring near the Boston Marathon finish line, many rushed to help those who were hurt.  We read about their actions with approval and admiration, but not with surprise.  On some level people understand that it is human nature to try to help, even if doing so involves risk or sacrifice.

This part of human nature is largely absent in business, a world that believes almost entirely in motivation through self-interest and even in the social good of self-interest

Jobless Benefits DO NOT Cause Unemployment

The Wall Street Journal's headline asks, "Are Jobless Benefits Leading to Higher Unemployment?"  But in the very first paragraph in their story they answer their own question with A new paper from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston suggests the answer is no -- or at least not much.   So then, why does the WSJ ask? Why not just use the headline of this post?

New Study Shows 1/3 of Jobs Prone to Offshore Outsourcing

The change in the skill (educational) level of jobs being moved abroad has led some to wonder whether the offshoring of service, unlike production, activities will result in college graduates facing a dwindling supply of entry-level jobs that have traditionally served as stepping-stones to higher skilled and higher paying positions. The notion that offshoring depresses job growth in the United States appears to underlie support among some policymakers for measures meant to encourage U.S. firms to expand employment domestically rather than abroad.

Corzine Gets Sued!

Just when you think they all got completely away with it, along comes one government regulator, the CFTC.  The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission issued a settlement with MF Global.   The firm settlement consisted of full restitution of the $1 billion customer money lost plus a $100 million fine.  Yet the CFTC also filed civil charges against former CEO Jon Corzine along with another MF Global executive, Edith O'Brien.

BIS Says Party Over for Quantitative Easing

The Bank for International Settlements has demanded Central Banks stop their quantitative easing in hopes of a global economic recovery.  All that has happened is a stock market love affair while the real economy languishes.  BIS has issued their annual report demanding nations deleverage, which is codespeak for austerity.

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