employment

Jolts Report Shows 2.6 Unemployed Per Job Opening in January 2014

The BLS JOLTS report, or Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey shows there are 2.6 official unemployed per job opening for January 2014.  Job openings were around four million yet hires and separations are almost equal, keeping the job market fairly static.   Job openings have increased 85% from July 2009, while hires have only increased 24% from the same time period.

Winter Polar Vortex Didn't Freeze The Unemployment Report

The February current population survey unemployment report is just plain weird and it is not due to weather.  First, the unemployment rate is an artificial 6.7%.  The unemployment rate increased by 0.1 percentage points due to more people being officially counted as unemployed.  Yet, the employment level is basically static, almost unchanged from last month, along with the labor participation rate.

Another Month, Another Piss Poor Jobs Report

The BLS employment report shows total nonfarm payroll jobs gained were another dismal 113,000 for January 2014, with private payrolls adding 142,000 jobs.  Government jobs decreased by -29,000.  The silver lining of the jobs report is while the government continues to cut, cut, cut, there wasn't a lot of growth in crappy jobs and gains achieved were in typically higher paying ones.  The U.S. post office alone shed 9,000 jobs.

December's Dismal Payrolls Mark Recession Six Year Anniversary

The BLS employment report shows total nonfarm payroll jobs gained were a paltry 74,000 for December 2013, with private payrolls adding 87,000 jobs.  Government jobs decreased by -13,000.  Worse, 40,400 of jobs gained were temporary ones.  That's over half, 54.6%, of December's jobs were temporary.

Unemployment Rate 6.7% As Half Million More Not In Labor Force

The December current population survey unemployment report is just plain weird.  First, the unemployment rate dropped another 0.3 percentage points to 6.7%, the lowest unemployment rate since October 2008.  The unemployment rate dropped because over half a million people dropped out of the labor force.  The unemployment rate's dramatic decline for 2013 is due primarily to people no longer being counted.

Initial Unemployment Claims Gone Wild

The DOL reported people filing for initial unemployment insurance benefits in the week ending on December 21th, 2013 was 338,000, a 42,000 decrease from the previous week of 373,000.  Many headlines proclaim this is the largest drop since November 2012, yet what the press does not mention is that very time period in 2012 also had wild, whacky statistical swings.

JOLTS Report Shows Labor Market Static

The BLS JOLTS report, or Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey shows there are 2.9 official unemployed per job opening for October 2013.  The headlines blare job openings are at the highest level in five years, but that's not the real story as hiring is way below pre-recession levels.   Job openings have increased 80% from July 2009, while hires have only increased 24% from the same time period.

Unemployment Rate Drops Dramatically to 7.0%

Welcome to the wild weird current population survey unemployment report where dramatic monthly swings cause paranoia and doubt.  We shed light on these woolly figures and this month there is much to flash that light on.  First, the unemployment rate dropped 0.3 percentage points to 7.0%.  This is the lowest unemployment rate since November 2008.

A Graphic Look at Payrolls from the September Employment Report

The BLS unemployment report shows total nonfarm payroll jobs gained were 148,000 for September 2013, with private payrolls adding 126,000 jobs.  Government jobs increased by 22,000.  Additionally 20,000 of September's jobs were temporary ones.   Overall job growth was barely enough to keep up with the growing population.

 

What's Going On With Initial Unemployment Claims?

The DOL reported people filing for initial unemployment insurance benefits in the week ending on October 12th, 2013 was 358,000, a 15,000 decrease from the previous week of 373,000.  The problem is these figures are really out of whack and we have one state to blame, California. We've seen strange soarings in initial claims before yet this was unexpected to occur again.

Pages